GMAT Score Chart

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Whether you’re about to embark on your GMAT® prep or you need to improve your score, the GMAT® score chart below can help you determine what Quant and Verbal scores you need to achieve your target total GMAT® score.

To calculate GMAT® scores, simply select your GMAT® target score from the dropdown menu. Highlighted boxes will appear on the score table. They indicate the various combinations of scores on the Quant (row) and Verbal (column) sections of the GMAT® that are likely to result in your target total score.

Then, keep reading to learn more about using GMAT® score charts, GMAT® score percentiles, and GMAT® scoring in general.

QUANT
VERBAL
V 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51
Q 46% 51% 56% 58% 61% 66% 68% 71% 76% 80% 82% 85% 89% 90% 94% 96% - 98% 99% 99% 99% 99% 99% 99% 99%
27 11% 460 470 480 490 500 500 510 510 520 530 540 550 560 560 570 580 - 580 590 590 600 600 600 610 610
28 13% 480 480 490 490 500 510 520 520 530 540 550 560 560 570 580 580 - 590 590 600 600 610 610 620 620
29 14% 480 490 500 500 510 510 520 530 540 550 550 560 570 570 580 590 - 600 600 610 610 620 620 630 630
30 16% 490 500 500 510 510 520 530 540 540 550 560 570 570 580 590 600 - 600 610 610 620 630 630 640 640
31 17% 490 500 510 520 520 530 540 540 550 560 570 580 580 590 600 600 - 610 610 620 630 640 640 650 650
32 19% 500 510 520 530 530 540 540 550 560 570 580 590 590 600 600 610 - 610 620 630 640 650 650 660 660
33 21% 510 520 530 530 540 550 550 560 570 580 580 590 600 600 610 620 - 620 630 640 650 660 660 670 670
34 22% 520 530 530 540 540 550 560 570 580 580 590 600 600 610 620 630 - 630 640 650 660 670 670 680 680
35 24% 530 530 540 540 550 560 570 580 580 590 600 600 610 620 630 640 - 640 650 660 670 670 680 690 690
36 26% 540 540 550 550 560 570 570 580 590 600 600 610 620 630 640 650 - 650 660 670 670 680 680 690 700
37 29% 540 550 550 560 570 580 580 590 600 610 610 620 630 640 650 650 - 660 670 670 680 680 690 700 710
38 31% 550 550 560 570 570 580 590 600 600 610 620 630 640 640 650 660 - 670 680 680 690 690 700 710 720
39 33% 550 560 570 570 580 590 600 600 610 620 630 630 640 650 660 670 - 680 690 690 700 700 710 720 730
40 36% 560 570 570 580 590 590 600 610 620 630 640 640 650 650 660 670 - 680 690 700 700 710 710 720 730
41 38% 570 570 580 590 590 600 610 620 630 640 640 650 650 660 670 680 - 690 700 700 710 710 720 730 730
42 41% 580 580 590 590 600 610 620 630 640 640 650 650 660 670 680 690 - 700 700 710 710 720 720 730 740
43 45% 580 590 590 600 610 620 630 640 640 650 650 660 670 680 690 700 - 700 710 720 720 720 730 740 740
44 48% 590 600 600 610 620 630 640 640 650 660 660 670 680 690 700 700 - 710 710 720 720 730 730 740 740
45 54% 590 600 610 620 630 640 640 650 650 660 670 680 690 700 710 710 - 720 720 730 730 740 740 750 750
46 57% 600 610 620 630 630 640 640 650 660 670 680 690 690 700 710 720 - 720 730 730 740 740 740 750 750
47 60% 600 610 620 630 640 640 650 660 670 680 690 690 700 710 720 720 - 730 740 740 750 750 750 760 760
48 67% 610 620 630 640 650 650 660 670 680 690 700 700 710 710 720 730 - 740 750 750 760 760 760 770 770
49 74% 630 630 640 650 660 660 670 680 690 700 710 710 720 720 730 740 - 750 760 760 770 770 770 780 780
50 86% 640 640 650 660 670 670 680 690 700 710 710 720 730 730 740 750 - 760 770 770 770 780 780 780 780
51 97% 640 650 660 670 670 680 690 700 710 710 720 730 740 740 750 760 - 770 770 780 780 780 790 790 800
*updated as of October 2021

Now that you’ve tried the GMAT® score chart, let’s dive into some key facts about how the GMAT® is scored.

GMAT® Scoring

The total score on the GMAT® ranges from 200 to 800.

KEY FACT:
The total score on the GMAT® ranges from 200 to 800

A test-taker’s performance on the Quant and Verbal sections of the GMAT® determine the total GMAT® score. The Quant and Verbal sections have score ranges from 6 to 51.

KEY FACT:
Both the Quant and Verbal sections of the GMAT® have score ranges from 6 to 51

Scores on the Integrated Reasoning (IR) section and the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) do not contribute to the total score.

You can read more about scoring on the GMAT.

Numerical GMAT® Scores Represent a Consistent Level of GMAT® Performance Over Time

Numerical GMAT® scores (200 to 800) represent a consistent level of performance over time, so that one can compare to the other. So, a GMAT® score from 5 years ago and the same GMAT® score today should reflect, essentially, the same general level of performance.

However, it’s important to keep in mind that there is an upward trend in GMAT® scores globally. As more test-takers earn higher GMAT® scores, MBA admissions committees could start raising the bar for expected GMAT® performance.

Need to raise the bar with your GMAT® score? Try the Target Test Prep GMAT® Course for just $1.

There Is No Verbal 43 Score on the GMAT® at This Time

On the GMAT® score chart, notice that the column representing a 43 score on the Verbal section is gray. It’s not possible to earn a 43 Verbal score on the GMAT®.

KEY FACT:
It’s Impossible to earn a 43 Verbal score on the GMAT®.

Some test-takers score V43 on third-party practice tests. That’s ok. But you won’t see an official GMAT® score with a V43.

What About V49 or V50 on the GMAT®?

You may have seen rumors flying around on GMAT® forums that it’s also impossible to score 49 or 50 in Verbal.

Rest assured, we’ve seen TTP students score 49 and 50 on the Verbal section. So, those scores are possible -- with the right study materials, of course.

KEY FACT:
V49 and V50 scores are possible on the GMAT®.

GMAT® Score Percentiles on the GMAT® Score Chart

As you know, the GMAT® scale ranges from 200 to 800.

Each GMAT® score has a corresponding percentile ranking. A percentile indicates what percentage of all other GMAT® test-takers you performed better than.

For example, 700 on the GMAT® represents the 87th percentile, meaning that a student who earns this score has outscored 87 percent of all test-takers.

KEY FACT:
A percentile ranking indicates what percentage of all other GMAT® test-takers you performed better than.

Your GMAT® Score Will Not Change Over Time

Your 200 to 800 GMAT® score will not change over time. In other words, if you scored a 740 three years ago, your GMAT® score is still a 740 today.

KEY FACT:
Your 200 to 800 GMAT® Score will not change over time.

However, your percentile rank may change.

Let’s talk more about this.

GMAT® Score Percentiles Have Changed Over Time

You’ll notice that there are percentile rankings associated with the Quant and Verbal scores on the GMAT® score chart. As we said, percentile rankings tell you how your scores stack up against the scores of other GMAT® test-takers. For example, a score of 49 on the Quant section currently would put you in the 74th percentile for Quant. This means that you scored better than 74 percent of all GMAT® test-takers on the Quant section

Most current GMAT® Quant Percentiles (2021) based on scores from January 2018 – December 2020

GMAT® Score Charts Can’t Guarantee a Particular Total Score.

Most Recent GMAT® Percentiles (2021)

Most Recent GMAT Percentiles (2021) Mean Score 40.7

GMAT® Percentiles 2016

GMAT Percentiles 2016 Mean Score 38.03

A GMAT® score chart is certainly a helpful tool in your planning. However, it’s important to note that a GMAT® score chart can’t guarantee a particular total GMAT® score

A Quant section score or Verbal section score represents a range of test performance. Thus, no GMAT® score calculator can predict what total score will result from a particular set of Quantitative and Verbal section scores with 100% accuracy, 100% of the time.

In other words, test-takers who earn the same Quant and Verbal scores could earn different total GMAT® scores.

TTP PRO TIP:
Test-takers who earn the same Quant and Verbal scores could earn different total GMAT® scores

Two Test-Takers Who Correctly Answer a Different Number of Questions Can Earn the Same Scores

Let’s consider two test-takers, A and B, who both score Q48/V40 on the GMAT® with:

  • Test-Taker A correctly answering 24 Quant questions and 30 Verbal questions
  • Test-Taker B correctly answering 23 Quant questions and 28 Verbal questions.

Although their section scores are the same (Q48/V40), Test-Taker A’s total GMAT® score would likely be 720, while Test-Taker B’s would likely be 710.

In other words, the Q48/V40 scaled scores represent a range of performance that both test-takers fell within. However, since they got different numbers of questions correct, their total scores would be different. (To learn more about how GMAC calculates scores, check out this article on GMAT® scoring.)

The upshot of this feature of GMAT® scoring is that there is a 10-point swing possible in either direction for the total score associated with any given combination of section scores. For example, per the score chart, Q49/V41 scores are likely to result in a total GMAT® score of 730. However, because each section score represents a range of performance, those same Quant and Verbal scores could result in a 720 or a 740 total score

So, think of any GMAT® scoring table more as a GMAT® score estimator than a GMAT® score guarantor. The truth is, no one can predict your total GMAT® score based on your section scores alone, because the GMAT® bases your total score directly on your performance on the Quant and Verbal sections, rather than on your numerical section scores.

Test-takers who earn the same Quant and Verbal scores could earn different total GMAT® scores

The TTP GMAT® Score Chart Uses Actual Official GMAT® Scores

Our GMAT® score chart reflects actual GMAT® exam scores reported by test-takers and data from official GMAT® Enhanced Score Reports. So, it’s still handy for seeing what scores you need to reach a specific GMAT® score range. It’s also helpful to see how many points you need to improve in a section to achieve your total target score.

KEY FACT:
The TTP GMAT® score chart reflects actual GMAT® exam scores reported by test-takers and data from official Enhanced Score Reports.

What Score Chart Combinations Will Get Me a 700 on the GMAT®?

You’ll notice when using the GMAT® score chart that several different combinations of Quant and Verbal scores can result in the same total score.

For example, Q48/V37 and Q45/V40 are just two of the section score combinations that could result in a total GMAT® score of 700.

KEY FACT:
Several combinations of Quant and Verbal scores can result in the same total score.

Not All 700 GMAT® Scores Are Equal

Not all 700 GMAT® scores are equal. When determining the section scores you need for reaching a particular total score for your MBA application, you should consider how the schools you’re targeting weigh individual section scores.

For example, top business schools tend to be highly quant-driven. Thus, MBA admissions committees at top-ranked programs generally prefer scores of 47+ on the Quant section of the GMAT®.

MBA admissions committees at top-ranked programs generally prefer scores of 47+ on the Quant section of the GMAT®.

Our GMAT® Score Chart Can Help You Better Plan Your GMAT® Study

Let’s say your top-choice school is Harvard Business School.

HBS is an M7 school. It consistently ranks in the top 10 business schools by U.S. News & World Report. The HBS Class of 2022 had a median GMAT® score of 730. If you’re applying to HBS, it may be wise to prepare to earn a 730 on the GMAT®.

Per the GMAT® score chart, you could achieve 730 with section scores of, for instance, Q50/V40 or Q46/V45. Now, V45 is undoubtedly a fantastic Verbal score -- one that only 1% of test-takers can achieve.

However, given that the median Quant score in HBS’s Class of 2022 was 48, all else equal, an MBA hopeful who applies to Harvard with Q46/V45 might not look as well-prepared to tackle a quant-heavy course load as an applicant with Q50/V40, even though both applicants earned a total score of 730 on the exam.

So, avoid using GMAT® score calculators with the attitude of “anything that gets me to X total score is sufficient.” Research the median and average GMAT® scores at your target schools. Take your overall applicant profile into account when determining the minimum Quant and Verbal scores you need to be competitive.

TTP PRO TIP:
Research the median and average GMAT® scores at your target schools. Take your overall applicant profile into account to determine the minimum Quant and Verbal scores you need to be a competitive applicant

Let’s talk more about GMAT® percentile rankings.

GMAT® Percentiles Reflect the Performance of All Test-Takers

GMAT® score percentiles, unlike numerical GMAT® scores, which show individual performance, reflect how all GMAT® test-takers have performed.

KEY FACT:
GMAT® percentiles reflect how all GMAT® test-takers have performed.

Thus, GMAT® percentile rankings can change over time, depending on how aggregate test-taker performance changes. In fact, according to a 2018 report by GMAC, in the 5 years from 2013 to 2017, the percentage of GMAT® test-takers globally who earned a total score of 600 to 690 increased. The percentage who earned a total score of 700 or higher also increased.

Since those increases mean that a greater percentage of test-takers earned, for example, a 700 score, the percentile ranking associated with a 700 score decreased somewhat over those 5 years.

The same goes for the section score percentile rankings you see on the GMAT® score chart. While those percentiles are the current rankings as of 2021, if, say, more GMAT® test-takers start scoring 44 on the Verbal section, that score will eventually no longer put a test-taker in the 98th percentile of all test-takers. Perhaps V44 would put a test-taker in the 97th percentile instead.

Key Take-Aways

  • Your GMAT® total score depends on your performance on only the Verbal and Quantitative sections of the GMAT®. The Integrated Reasoning (IR) and Analytical Writing (AWA) scores do not factor into the total GMAT® score
  • Section scores, both Verbal and Quant, range from 6 to 51. The GMAT® total score ranges from 200 to 800
  • Identical Verbal and Quant scores can give rise to different total GMAT® scores. This is because, for example, one Verbal score (e.g. V47) could be earned by the test-taker getting a range of questions correct. A student earning a “low” V47 might have answered fewer questions correctly than a student who scored a “high” V47. A similar situation applies to the Quant score.
  • A GMAT® Score Chart can be used to estimate the total GMAT® score based on combinations of individual section scores for Verbal and Quant.
  • Highly-ranked business schools generally prefer high quant scores. Thus, admissions committees may view a high GMAT® total score driven more by a high Quant component more positively than one driven by a high Verbal component.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

According to GMAC, the company that administers the GMAT®, from January 2019 to December 2021:

  • Average GMAT score: 574
  • Average GMAT quant score: 41
  • Average GMAT verbal score: 27
  • Average GMAT IR score 4.65
  • Average GMAT AWA score: 4.43

Using data from 2021, only about 13% of all test-takers scored a 700 or above on the GMAT®. In other words, a GMAT® score of 700 represents an 87th percentile score.

Using data from 2021, only about 1% of all test-takers scored 760 or above on the GMAT®. In other words, a GMAT® score of 760 represents a 99th percentile score.

A score of 700 on the GMAT® represents an 87th-percentile score. In other words, about 87 percent of all test-takers score below 700. That is, only about 13 percent of all GMAT® test-takers earn a score of 700 or greater.

If the people who have created a GMAT® score chart have used accurate, official GMAT® score data, then that GMAT® score chart will be accurate. For example, the TTP GMAT® Score Chart is highly accurate because it reflects official GMAT® data.

A good GMAT® score is one that gets you into the MBA program of your choice. However, most people consider a GMAT® score of 700 or higher a good GMAT® score.

There are a number of factors to consider when deciding whether to cancel your GMAT® score. This article on canceling your GMAT® score will give you the insight needed to help you decide.

We have learned that a GMAT® score chart can provide valuable information about the combination of verbal and quant scores that result in the all-important total GMAT® score. If you are shooting for a high score, read our mini-guide to scoring a 700 for information, tips, and techniques for doing your best on this challenging exam.

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